7 Shocking Job Search Statistics and How You Can Use Them

There’s no doubt about it – job hunting can be frustrating. You’re qualified, have a great personality – any company would be lucky to have you! So, why didn’t you get the job – or even an interview? We’ve rounded up 7 job search statistics from hiring managers and recruiters to help you get the job you deserve!

1 – The average time recruiters spend looking at a resume is 6 seconds
There’s not much you can do in 6 seconds, but according to most recruiters, reviewing your resume is one of them. Use design – including colour, font and layout – to make your resume eye-catching. With your wording and descriptions, find a way to quickly showcase your personality – possibly in a summary. Make your job description points short and impactful by using numbers and action verbs. Example: Increased Instagram followers by 63% in 3 months.

2 – 76% of resumes are discarded due to use of an unprofessional email address
We always recommend showcasing your personality on your resume – just not in your email address! Always use an email address that is professional and simple (like michael.smith@fakeemail.com). We also do not recommend using your year of birth in your email address (ex. michaelsmith1987@fakeemail.com) as employers are not supposed to hire based on factors like age.

3 – 68% of employers search applicants on Facebook
Sure, partying with your friends is fun but it could cost you the job. Ensure that all of your social media accounts are either 100% private, or if you choose to have them public, keep it professional! If you’re applying for a suit-wearing, corporate office job, the hiring manager may not appreciate the profile picture of your big win at your friends beer pong tournament.

4 – 33% of bosses say they know within the first 90 seconds of an interview if they will hire the candidate
Excellent credentials and a great cover letter won’t save you from a bad first impression. Hiring managers reported things like failure to make eye contact, poor clothing choices and even being on your phone while in the waiting room as negative factors in knowing if they will hire someone or not. Dress well, be aware of your body language and instead of being on your phone, try to engage in conversation with the receptionist and build rapport.

5 – The average number of people who apply for any given job is 118
With a great job, comes great competition. The good thing is, there are things you can do to stand out from the pack, like:

  • Provide relevant professional experience only. A hiring manager for an accounting firm doesn’t care that you worked at banana stand in 2004.
  • Stalk them! Follow them on the company’s social media channels. The more they see your name, the better.
  • Show your personality in your application email. Make it short but include some information that showcases who you are.

6 – 58% of hiring managers said they’ve caught a lie on a resume
Liar, liar – you aren’t hired! It can be tempting to embellish your resume to perfectly fit the job you are applying for, but it is not worth the risk. Not only is it embarrassing to not be able to back up your fib, but it could also seriously damage your reputation as a job seeker, especially in a small industry.

7 – Only the top 2% of candidates land an interview
Applying for a job is about quality – not quantity. These days, hiring managers an inundated with dozens, sometimes hundreds of applications for a single job. Instead of mass applying, find a handful of great opportunities that you really want, that you’d be a great fit for and focus your time and energy on those applications. Putting in the effort that others did not is a simple way to stand out amongst the masses.

The numbers don’t lie! Get the job you want, and don’t become another statistic!

Use Resume.com’s free resume builder and start your job search using our job listings — don’t forget to publish your resume for employers to search and find your resume directly !

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